I have written quite a bit about getting and keeping quality volunteers but not what to look for in a new volunteer. Are there traits that make a good tech volunteer? Well, yes. Yes there are.

The first mistake of getting volunteers is to get them for the sake of having them. I see so many leaders trying to fill positions so desperately that the only requirement seems to be “Can you fog a mirror? Great! Push this button.”

While I totally understand that Sunday comes every week, it is a big mistake to just fill positions and hope for the best.

The best teams I have had and the best teams I’ve seen in action approach filling volunteer positions the same way they fill staff positions. Having actual requirements for your volunteer positions is a must if you want cohesive, long lasting teams.

The best teams I have seen in action approach filling volunteer positions the same way they fill staff positions.

Having job descriptions is also not a bad idea. This gives you a place to put down not only the requirements of the person you need in the position, but also the personality and temperament they should have.

Most volunteer positions read; “Must love to serve. Must be a Christ follower. Must attend Bible Study/Sunday School. Must have a servant’s heart. Must love tech. Must be organized. Must be willing to give up an entire Sunday morning.” You get the drift. Those are all good things, but there is so much more to being a great part of the team, especially with the demands of the tech team.

As I looked over job requirements online as well as those I have received over the years, here are some things to take into consideration:

Have they served in other ministries in your church? If they have, consult with that ministry lead and find out about them. Sometimes people go from ministry to ministry laying waste and leaving a body count. You don’t want that to infiltrate your ministry.

Sometimes people go from ministry to ministry laying waste and leaving a body count. You don’t want that to infiltrate your ministry.

What’s their biggest strength? This is a great question because you find out how vain people are. I know that sounds devious, but it really is helpful when you are building a team. You need to have people who can submit to your leadership. It will also tell you who are the organized people. They will not fane humility, but rather tell you right up front that they are very organized. A+ to them.

Are they willing to serve at all services for a particular weekend? This will tell you a lot. You may not have them serve at all services, but their willingness to be flexible is something you want to know up front.

Do they have interests outside of church and work? This will help you know more about them. Things that bond the team together are always good to know.

Is there anything in their past that would potentially make people question why they are allowed to serve in ministry? This is not to disqualify people. It just lets you avoid getting blindsided once they do start to serve in your ministry. I recommend doing a background check on all perspective volunteers, especially if they may work with anyone under 18.

Have them observe and see how they interact with the rest of your team. Although most people are on their best behavior when they are on the “first date”, if you are observant, you can still learn a lot about how they play with others and whether or not they can stay focused and engaged. If after a couple of services they seem bored and distracted, they may not be right for the tech team.

The more you get to know those that want to serve in your ministry, the better your teams will be.

The bottom line is this: The more you get to know those that want to serve in your ministry, the better your teams will be. You should never have people serve just because you “need” people. Take your time and find the right people. Remember, like the gear and the building itself, you have to live with your volunteers every week. Choose wisely.